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Dakara: The “face domain formation” article proved that early experience shapes preferential looking. How might this impact one’s experience when looking at art from different cultures?
Mercury: How might new technologies and access to new visual stimuli in infants/early development affect the preferential looking for future generations? Some examples include digital formats and medias.
Mercury: How might new technologies and access to new visual stimuli in infants/early development affect the preferential looking for future generations? Some examples include digital formats and medias.
Tretogor: The Lehrer piece mentions that Vincent van Gogh might have "thought that the coronas he painted around stars and streetlamps were real," Monet became blind but didn't stop painting, and that Degas became myopic "which led him to do more and more sculpture." In what ways could a person without physiological setbacks, when given googles that can simulate the effects of alcohol, marijuana, or a concussion, start to perceive different representations just as van Gogh, Degas, and Monet might have experienced?
Baldhorn: The piece by Lehrer talks about Cezanne's works and the way it "exposes the process of seeing"(p. 98). It discusses specifically how his paintings have "no boundaries or stark black lines separating one thing from the next," but how this is actually "the start of vision" (p.98). In what ways can our perception of something be shaped, or altered? What defines reality, and how does one view it initially as they first "see" something?
Milky Way: What could be some of the socio-geographic implications of the importance of early experience in domain-specific (in particular, facial) visual development?